Kenilworth School

Curriculum information

Art

Art - Fine Art

The course

The two-year linear course with Eduqas (WJEC) allows us greater flexibility to deliver a course that is more engaging, creative and structured to allow all students to improve both their artistic skills and their conceptual understanding of artwork.

What will I learn?

Year 1

You will attend a series of workshops that cover the bases of visual language. You will be instructed how to use artistic materials from a traditional standpoint before being given the freedom to explore these experimentally and creatively. You will learn how to use a wide range of artistic media, both 3D and 2D, with improved competence and how to deconstruct works of art in order to understand how other artists approach different topics and themes. By the summer you will have started your main A level project, where you will use and display the skills you have acquired to a thorough, personal and well-developed project.

Year 2

You continue to develop your main portfolio of work to create a final piece. This is worth 60% of the A level. In February you will start a second project, which makes up the final 40% of the A level.

At the end of year 13, we celebrate your successes with an external exhibition in a local gallery space, which is co-curated with the students and gallery owners.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

  • Life drawing classes, Year 13, annually
  • Trip to London, Year 12 and 13, annually
  • Art in Action at Warwick University, Year 13, annually

 

Art - Graphic Communication

The two-year linear course with Eduqas (WJEC) allows us greater flexibility to deliver a course that is more engaging, creative and structured to allow all students to improve both their design skills and their understanding of how to visually communicate effectively.

What will I learn?

Year 1

You will attend a series of workshops that cover the bases of visual communication and the pillars of graphic design. You will be instructed how to use different media before being given the freedom to explore these experimentally and creatively to a series of mini briefs. You will learn how to use a wide range of artistic media, both 3D and 2D, hand-made and digital, with improved competence for more professional outcomes. You will also learn how to deconstruct works of art in greater depth in order to understand how other designers approach different design briefs. By the summer you will have started your main A level project, where you will use and display the skills you have acquired to a thorough, personal and well-developed project.

Year 2

You continue to develop your main portfolio of work to create a final piece. This is worth 60% of the A level. In February you will start a second project, which makes up the final 40% of the A level.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

  • Life drawing classes, Year 13, annually
  • Trip to London, Year 12 and 13, annually
  • Art in Action at Warwick University, Year 13, annually

Biology

AS and A2 level Biology will give you an understanding of the processes that take place in living organisms e.g. Osmosis, Mitosis, DNA, Heart structure, Diseases, Reproduction and Nerves.

During the year the aim is to build on concepts developed in the National Curriculum and extend the student’s knowledge and understanding whilst developing communication, experimental and IT skills.

Practical work is a major element of the course and students will need to enhance their experimental skills of planning investigations, carrying them out, collecting evidence, interpreting and evaluating evidence.

BTEC Sport

Rationale of the BTEC Nationals in Sport

A BTEC National in Sport is one of the most popular BTEC courses.

It is a vocational qualification that will help prepare you for a huge range of careers. You may be thinking of pursuing a career in the sports industry and this would be the ideal course to help you meet your potential. You may be considering joining the health and fitness industry as an exercise professional, or thinking of Sports Psychology, Nutrition or Coaching, the opportunities are endless.

How is the BTEC structured?

This course requires you to supervise and instruct people who are taking part in exercise classes or training and show ways to improve their lifestyle. Research has shown a clear link between an active lifestyle and good health. As a result, the health and fitness industry has grown significantly over the last 10 years, and will probably continue to grow. There is a demand for exercise professionals and there are good employment opportunities for successful students.

The BTEC National is divided into Mandatory units (the ones you must do) and Optional units.  Units 1, 2 and 3 are Mandatory units and Units 1& 2 are assessed externally. Unit 3 & 7 will be assessed internally.

Business Studies

Business Studies is an exciting multi-disciplinary subject focusing on institutions and problems of the business world.  The course is designed for students who have aspirations for a career in Advertising, Marketing or Management. Organisation and Content of the Course This is one of the most popular courses at Kenilworth Sixth Form because it prepares students for university and /or a future career in management.   There are three examinations at the end of the A Level course.  Students will investigate different types and sizes of organisation in various business sectors and environments, and in local, national and global contexts.  The teaching allows for students to gain AS or A Level accreditation.

What topics do we study?

  • Marketing strategies
  • Branding
  • Management and motivation Entrepreneurs and leadership
  • Financial planning
  • Resource management
  • Economic influences
  • Business decision making
  • Ethics and culture
  • How to manage change


A Level results are significantly above national average. The department has close links with local industry, with visiting speakers from local companies.  We arrange regular educational visits to student conferences and business events.

What can I do with this A Level?

A Level Business is a highly respected qualification and is held in great esteem by universities and employers alike.  Business complements almost every course across the curriculum.  It combines particularly well with Social Sciences (like Psychology, Sociology & Economics), Humanities, Design subjects, Mathematics and Languages.  The course will provide you with a broad-based preparation for a wide range of management careers in industry, commerce or the public service.  The vast majority of students studying A level Business will progress on to one of the many business related degree courses.

What extra-curricular activities do we offer?

  • Opportunity to set up your own business through Young Enterprise.  You can emulate a decade of award winning teams that have represented the Sixth Form.
  • A number of visits and competitions through local university partnerships.
  • Enterprise days that allow you to work with local businesses and entrepreneurs.

 

A Level Business helps student

  • Develop a critical understanding of organisations, the markets they serve and the process of adding value
  • Be aware that business behaviour can be studied from the perspectives of a range of stakeholders
  • Acquire a range of skills including decision-making and problem solving
  • Be aware of the current structure of business and business practice.

Are there any specific entry requirements?

There is no requirement to have studied Business or Applied Business at GCSE because the course content at A Level is significantly different from that studied at GCSE level. Students must meet Sixth Form entry criteria.

98% of students attained A* to C

Chemistry

Studying A-Level Chemistry will provide you with in-depth knowledge of this fascinating subject, preparing you for further education or giving you the credentials to enhance your future career choices.

Chemists have greatly improved the quality of life for the majority of people. The A Level Chemistry course is underpinned by the practical skills that we call ‘How Science Works’. You will also learn about how chemists are real innovators, designing solutions to the problems that affect modern life.

Students with a wide range of interests enjoy the Chemistry course; whether your ambition is a future in medicine, industry or research, Chemistry is the solid platform upon which careers are built.

What do our students like about the course:

  1. Being challenged by the subject and made to think for themselves.
  2. How their knowledge and skills are built as the course progresses.
  3. How comprehensive the course is, which gives them an insight into different kinds of chemistry.
  4. The hands-on work in the lab when completing practical work.

Knowledge and skills learnt:

  1. An understanding of how the chemical elements interact and the role they play in making up our world and beyond.
  2. An appreciation of How Science Works.
  3. The relevance of science beyond the laboratory.
  4. Analytical, evaluative and synoptic skills.
  5. Practical skills, including the ability to plan and manipulate information and data.

Structure of the course:

Students will learn about all aspects of Chemistry during 5 hours of teacher contact time per week.

There is no longer a coursework element although students must conduct 16 Core Practical experiments with written analysis during the 2 years to which they must Pass each.

The final A-Level grade is awarded solely on end of year examination.

 

Students will study the following topics and will sit the follow end of year examinations:

YEAR 1:

  • TOPIC 1 – Atomic structure
  • TOPIC 2 – Bonding & Structure, Shapes and Intermolecular forces
  • TOPIC 3 – Redox
  • TOPIC 4 – Inorganic Chemistry
  • TOPIC 5 – Formulae, Equations and Moles
  • TOPIC 6 – Organic Chemistry
  • TOPIC 7 – Analytical Chemistry (Mass spectrometry & Infra-Red spectroscopy)
  • TOPIC 8 – Energetics
  • TOPIC 9 – Kinetics
  • TOPIC 10 – Equilibrium

 

YEAR 2:

  • TOPIC 11 – Equilibrium II
  • TOPIC 12 – Acid-base Equilibrium
  • TOPIC 13 – Energetics II (Entropy)
  • TOPIC 14 – Redox II (Electrochemical cells)
  • TOPIC 15 – Transition Metal Chemistry
  • TOPIC 16 – Kinetics II
  • TOPIC 17 – Organic Chemistry II (Carbonyl Chemistry)
  • TOPIC 18 – Organic Chemistry III (Arenes and Organic Nitrogen Chemistry)
  • TOPIC 19 – Analytical Chemistry (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

 

END OF YEAR 1 EXAM: (Internal Exam)

Every student will sit the following exams at the end of year 1:

Paper 1:               80 marks                              1:30 hrs                                50% weighting

Paper 2:               80 marks                              1:30 hrs                                50% weighting

 

END OF YEAR 2 EXAM: (External Exam)

Only those students wishing to complete the full A-Level will continue into year 2. Their qualification will be solely based on the following exams sat at the end of the year 2 which covers topics 1-19:

Paper 1:               90 marks                              1:45 hrs                                30% weighting

Paper 2:               90 marks                              1:45 hrs                                30% weighting

Paper 3:               120 marks                           2:30 hrs                                35% weighting

 

FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES:

  • Participation in the International Chemistry Olympiad competition and the Cambridge Chemistry Challenge.
  • Invitation to Chemistry lectures at The University of Warwick.
  • Undertaking lab work in the undergraduate laboratory at The University of Warwick.
  • Visits and talks at Kenilworth School delivered by lecturers and researchers from The University of Warwick.

Computer Science

“At its heart lies the notion of computational thinking: a mode of thought that goes well beyond software and hardware, and that provides a framework within which to reason about systems and problems.” (Computer Science a Curriculum for Schools).

Computer Science is a new course that relates to the ever changing world of technology.  Computer Science is a practical subject where learners can apply the academic principles learned in the classroom to real world systems. It is an intensely creative subject that combines invention and excitement, that can look at the natural world through a digital prism.

What can students do with A Level Computer Science?

Computer Science is a wide ranging subject with a number of different branches. Many students go onto University or Technical apprenticeship in industry. Computer Science covers areas for Networking, game design, programming development of software, Network Security and much more. A Level Computer Science complements many other A Levels, and is useful in taking degrees in areas of engineering, business or design.

Who teaches Computer Science?

Staff have a range of skills on an International sphere in both educational and industrial settings. Highly qualified and up-to-date expertise that will serve as an excellent bedrock for learning. All staff are trained in the field of computing and have extensive experience in a range of educational and work settings. Staff are keen to maintain cutting edge response to our ever-changing technological world.

Students are encouraged to develop a wide range of skills and together with an on-depth knowledge of computing in the community and industry students are well prepared for Higher Education or a career in the computing industry. Emphasis is on the business real world situations and
candidates are encouraged to work with real world case
studies. PYTHON is the language we will be using primarily.

Criminology

Why study criminology?

Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminal behaviour and the criminal justice system. Criminology is an increasingly popular subject for students who are interested in a career in criminal justice, or studying criminology at university. The subject explores why people commit crime, drawing on explanations from psychology and sociology, along with how society tackles crime through the law, policing and punishment. Students learn about different types of crime, how people’s perceptions of crime are shaped and how crimes are investigated.

Course information

As an Applied General qualification, each unit within the qualification has an applied purpose which acts as a focus for the learning in the unit. The applied purpose requires that learning be related to authentic case studies. The applied purpose will also allow students to learn in such a way that they develop:

  • skills required for independent learning and development
  • a range of generic and transferable skills
  • the ability to solve problems
  • the skills of project-based research, development and presentation
  • the fundamental ability to work alongside other professionals, in a professional    environment
  • the ability to apply learning in vocational contexts


The diploma is made up of four units. Two are internally assessed and two are externally assessed and it is graded A*-E. It has the same UCAS points as an A Level subject.

Year 1

Unit 1

Changing Awareness of crime

Internal controlled assessment

Year 1

Unit 2

Criminological theories

External examination

Year 2

Unit 3

Crime scene to courtroom

Internal controlled assessment

Year 2

Unit 4

Crime and Punishment

External examination

 

What can studying criminology lead to?

The kinds of question addressed in Year 1:

* What different types of crime are there (e.g. white collar crime; hate crime)?

* Why do certain crimes go unreported, and what are the consequences of this?

* How does media shape public perceptions of crime?

* How do laws change from culture to culture or from one time period to another?

* What theories have been developed to try and explain why some people turn to crime?

The kinds of question addressed in Year 2:

* Which people are involved in investigating crime?

* What techniques are used to identify who has committed a crime?

* What is the process for prosecuting suspects?

* What types of punishment are there?

* Who is involved in the punishment of offenders?

* What is trying to be achieved by punishing offenders?

* Which agencies are involved in social control, and how effective are they?

 

 This qualification will support access to degree courses such as;

  • BSc/ BA Criminology
  • BA Criminology and Criminal justice
  • BSc Criminology and Psychology
  • LLB Law and Criminology
  • BA Criminology and Sociology
  • BSc Psychology and Sociology
  • BSc Criminology and Law

 

Alternatively, the qualification allows learners to gain the required understanding and skills to consider employment within some aspects of the criminal justice system, e.g. the National Probation service, the courts and tribunal service or the National Offender Management service.

Please note the following regarding the course, students will not be able to choose Criminology, Sociology and Psychology together in their options as this combination of subjects could reduce chances of getting into a Russell Group university. Places will be limited.

Drama

What will I learn?

We want students to have an inspiring experience of A-level Drama and Theatre. This qualification emphasises practical creativity alongside research and theoretical understanding. You will extend your ability to create Drama and Theatre, either in a performing or production role. Students learn through experience, seeing theatre and making theatre for themselves. Students are introduced to a wide range of theatrical styles and contexts as they explore plays practically, devise and work on performances.

Is this subject right for me?

If you  have previous interest in any aspect of the Performing Arts then this is the course for you. You need to be curious about issues and ideas and have a creative instinct for communicating your views through drama. You may be keen on acting, writing or on the visual and technical side of the Theatre and wish to develop your skills in some or all of these areas. Equally you will be interested in going to the theatre to see plays performed by different theatre companies.

What can I do after I’ve completed the course?

This AS and Advanced GCE can lead to further study in Drama, Theatre Studies and Performing Arts in Higher Education or HND level. It can be used as part of your course to broaden your studies and may lead on to a career in the performing Arts industry- options include, Crewing, Technical Theatre, Theatre in Education, Arts Education. Some students go on to study Journalism, TV production, Radio production and Acting for TV, Film and Radio and even careers in Law and Social Work.

Drama and Theatre Studies AS and Advanced GCE complements a range of subjects, particularly Psychology, Sociology and English. It is a course widely recognised by many of the leading universities as an excellent way of developing key, transferrable skills such as collaberative approaches, creative thinking, presentation skills and time management.

Economics

Organisation and Content of the Course At the heart of our course you will gain a real insight into the relevance of economics to the modern world; teaching is designed to engage you and facilitate an understanding of your role in society. The stimulating subject content will encourage you to develop your skills as independent learners, critical thinkers and decision-makers – all personal assets that can make you stand out as you progress to higher education and/or the workplace. No previous knowledge of Economics is required because the Lower Sixth year gives an overview of the whole range of economic theory and its application to current economic issues and problems. 

What can I do with this A Level? Economics combines well with most A Level subjects.  You will find the subject useful for the majority of careers. Economics graduates earn the second highest salary of all university courses. Students who take this course go on to study not just Economics or finance/management related courses, but also Law, Engineering, Mathematics, History and a wide range of other subjects.

Why study Economics? As a respected academic subject, having an A Level in Economics means whatever you decide to do in the future, employers or universities will see that you have a range of important skills learnt through the subject. Understanding real world problems and the potential solutions also helps you to make the best decisions in the future. A Level results for 2016 were significantly above national average.

67% of students attained A* to B,

Course Structure

There are three examinations at the end of the A level course, focusing on microeconomics, macroeconomics and themes in economics, with the latter offering an exciting opportunity for learners to apply theories and concepts to up-to-date contexts and events. The teaching allows for students to gain AS or A Level accreditation.

What topics will I study?

  • Government economic policy objectives – economic growth, unemployment, inflation, increased trade & income distribution
  • How competitive markets work
  • Scarcity and choice
  • ompetition & market power
  • Financial markets
  • Inequality and the Environment
  • Labour market


Extra-curricular activities

  • Taster lectures at Warwick University Finance competitions
  • Young Enterprise
  • Fantasy stock market competition
  • Work Experience

English Language

You will be encouraged to develop your interest in and enjoyment of English through learning about its structures and its functions, its development and its variation.  The course will allow you to develop your ability to express yourself in speech and writing for a variety of audiences and in both fiction and non-fiction genres. 

Why Study English Language? 

English Language is a well-established and widely respected A Level that will give you a good foundation for both university and future employment.  It will develop your critical and analytical reading skills as well as improving your writing skills for a variety of audiences and purposes.  It will also give you an insight into the way language works on a societal level.  It is useful for law, teaching, journalism and business management. 

You will be assessed by both examinations and NEA (coursework). 

Paper 1 

Language, the Individual & Society 2 hour 30 minute exam (worth 40% of the A Level). This paper explores a range of texts focusing on how they represent a topic and child language acquisition 

Paper 2 

Language Diversity & Change 2 hour 30 minute exam (40% of the A Level)  

This looks at how language is affected by gender, power, occupation, accents and dialects, different social groups and language change over time.  You will also have to produce an article based on a given language topic and two articles provided in the examination paper 

Coursework 

Language in Action – word count 3,500 (20% of the A Level)  

Students complete a language investigation on a topic they chose in conjunction with their teacher plus a piece of original writing and a commentary that can be any genre: opinion articles, a short story, a piece of travel writing or any other piece of writing a student is interested in. 

English Literature

The course will develop your interest and enjoyment of literature.  You will read a variety of texts written across centuries by both male and female authors and covering a variety of genres.  You will also learn about the influences on writers and how these affect their ideas and styles of writing as well as looking at critical responses to texts. 

Why Study English Literature? 

English Literature is a very well established and widely respected A Level that will give you an excellent foundation for many university or employment applications. It will develop your critical reading skills and your ability to analyse a text in detail.  It will be useful for anyone interested in a business career, publishing and journalism.  It is considered a facilitating subject and is looked on with very high regard by all universities, especially Russell Group ones.

You will be assessed by both examination and NEA (coursework) 

Paper 1 

Literary Genres (closed book) 

You will explore 3 texts in the genre of tragedy: Othello, Death of a Salesman and some poetry by Keats  

Aspects of Tragedy – 2 hours 30 mins (40% of the A Level) 

Paper 2  

Texts and Genres (open book) 

Elements of Political and Social Protest – 3 hours (40% of the A Level) 

1 unseen passage on the theme of social and political protest.  We also study The Handmaid’s Tale, The Kite Runner and poetry by Blake 

Coursework  

Theory and Independence 

2 essays of 1250 – 1500 words each, one on a poetry text, one on a prose text, informed by study of the Critical Anthology.   

English Language/Literature combined

This course will deepen your knowledge and understanding of both language and literature and enrich your experience of English. You will discover the main linguistic and literary approaches and methods of study, and how these relate to each other in, for example, the integrated study of spoken and written, literary and non-literary, digital and non-digital texts. As well as preparing for two examinations which require you to develop both critical and creative responses to a variety of texts, non-examination assessments will give you the opportunity to make integrated links between literary and non-literary texts of your own choice.

Why study English Language and Literature?

Many degree level courses in English now require integrated study of language and literature. As well as developing your knowledge of both linguistic and literary methods, the course will develop high level critical and close reading skills, enhancing your ability to analyse texts from a variety of perspectives. Your knowledge of the English language will be developed, as will your writing skills in a variety of critical, creative and analytical modes. This A level is highly valued in preparing you for a wide range of university degree courses and possible careers: if you are interested in business and marketing, publishing or journalism, for example, this would be a useful, relevant subject choice.

You will be assessed by both examinations and NEA (coursework)

Paper 1
Telling Stories a 3 hour closed book examination (worth 40% of A Level).
You will answer an essay-style question and compose and commentate on a piece of ‘re-cast’ writing based on the study of an anthology of written, spoken and mixed media texts about Paris.
You will answer questions on a novel you have studied for the ‘imagined worlds’ theme (eg. Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale) and on two poems by a modern poet you have studied (eg. Seamus Heaney).

Paper 2
Exploring Conflict 2hour 30min examination (worth 40% of the A level).
One critical essay question is based on the study of the language of conflict on a drama set text (e.g. Othello).
One piece of ‘re-cast’ or ‘recreative writing’ based on the study of a set novel text based on the theme of conflict (e.g. Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner).   

Non-Exam Assessment (coursework) “Making Connections”: A 2,500-3,000-word independent investigation worth 20% of your overall assessment. You will explore a specific theme or technique of writing in literary and non-literary texts of your choice.

 

This is a ‘stand-alone’ combined language and literature course and cannot be studied alongside either of the two other English A levels

Fashion & Textiles

We offer A-Level Fashion & Textiles through the WJEC Art: Textiles route. This follows on smoothly from GCSE Textiles, GCSE Design & Technology with a Textiles specialism or GCSE Art: Textiles.

This exciting course will thoroughly prepare students for further study and careers in this field. Students have the opportunity to investigate and explore the worlds of Fashion, Costume, Surface Design, Printed Textiles, Accessories, Installation and Interior Design; eventually choosing a route that suits them. Students are encouraged to take inspiration from many facets of life to inform creative and innovative designs for products that have a specific end use and target market. They will be able to work using a range of mixed media to hone their practical skills throughout the course, and will develop individualised approaches to the design process.

Year one of the course will consist of a series of small projects designed to develop technical skills and creativity. These projects will include the study of garment making, fabric manipulation, CAD, pattern development, shaping and colouring techniques, to name but a few. Towards the end of year one, we will begin preparation for the assessment tasks as outlined below:

We will also be running a trip to Florence and Milan, giving our students a fantastic opportunity to experience the 'home of high fashion'.

Staff consistently keep up with innovation and changes within the industry so that we can keep students knowledge up to date, better preparing them for stepping into the world of fashion and textiles.

What next? Over the years, our students have gone on to degree courses in the fashion and design industry and many have moved into fantastic careers.

Courses include:

  • Fashion Design
  • Fashion: Business and Buying
  • Fashion: Marketing and Merchandising
  • Costume Design
  • Textiles: Surface Design
  •  
  • Some of our past students have become:
  • Footwear Designers
  • Costume Designers
  • Garment Technologists
  • Fashion Buyers
  • Jewellery Designers
  • Fashion Merchandisers
  • Textile Engineers

 

Geography

The Geography course is a contemporary, issues-based approach to both human and physical geography.  It covers a wide range of contemporary themes and issues, enabling students to explore and evaluate geographical questions and issues such as the consequences of globalisation, responses to hazards, water insecurity and climate change. Students develop an in-depth understanding of the world around us and foster an understanding of what could impact its future. The course develops synopticity and encourages students to see ‘the bigger picture’ and confidently link geographical processes, themes, ideas and concepts together across topics.  Students become critical, reflective and independent learners. Students can build on what they’ve learned at GCSE and what they see in the world today, and gain the knowledge, skills and understanding vital to success at A level and beyond.

What will you study on the A-level course?

Dynamic Landscapes includes Tectonic Processes and Hazards (cause of tectonic hazards is key to both increasing the degree to which they can be managed, and putting in place successful responses that can mitigate impacts and allow humans to adapt to hazard occurrence).

Coastal Landscapes and Change (Coastal landscapes operate as coastal systems and produce distinctive coastal landscapes, these are increasingly threatened from physical processes and human activities, and there is a need for sustainable management)

Dynamic Places includes Globalisation (global interdependence results in changing opportunities, cultural impacts on identity and inequalities as shifts in patterns of wealth occur. Tensions in communities and pressures on environments need to be sustainably managed) Urban Regeneration (understanding how places change and are shaped by social and economic processes. Urban and rural regeneration programmes involving a range of players. The success of regeneration depends on the extent to which places are changed).

Physical Systems and Sustainability includes The Water

Physical Systems and Sustainability includes The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity (Water plays a key role in supporting life on earth. The water cycle operates at a variety of scales. Changes to stores of water are a result of both physical and human processes. Water insecurity is becoming a global issue with serious consequences and there is a range of different approaches to managing water supply). The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security A balanced carbon cycle is important in maintaining planetary health. The carbon cycle operates at a range of scales. Physical processes control the movement of carbon. Climate change poses a serious threat to the health of the planet. There is a range of adaptation and mitigation strategies that could be used).

Human Systems and Geopolitics Superpowers have changed over time. Superpowers have a very significant impact on the global economy, global politics and the environment. The spheres of influence between these powers are frequently contested, resulting in geopolitical implications). Health, Human Rights and Intervention (development are based largely on economic measures but many new measures are used to record progress at all scales in human rights and human welfare. The impact of geopolitical interventions on both human health and wellbeing and human rights is variable and contested)

Students are required to complete a minimum of four days of fieldwork investigating processes in both physical and human geography environments. Students can further explore a part of the course that fascinates them through the Independent Investigation.

How is the course assessed?

Paper 1 - Physical Geography: Dynamic Landscapes and Physical Systems and Sustainability, 2 hours & 15 minutes’ exam, worth 30% of A’Level.

Paper 2 – Human Geography: Dynamic Places and Human Systems and Geopolitics, 2 hours & 15 minutes’, worth 30% of A’Level.

Paper 3 - Synoptic investigation of a contemporary geographical issue, 2 hours & 15 minutes, worth 20% of A’Level.

NEA Non Examined Assessment - Independent Investigation based on fieldwork, 3000 – 4000 word report, 20% of A’Level.

Examinations:

There are three exam papers and one piece of coursework.

Exam 1 focuses on the Physical Geography and is 2 hours long. It is worth 30% of the final grade.

Exam 2 focuses on the Human Geography and is 2 hours long. It is worth 30% of the final grade.

Exam 3 focuses on the Geography as a whole and draws together many of the ideas studied over the course. It is 1 hour 45 minutes hours long and is worth 20% of the final grade.

The “independent study” or coursework is worth 20% of the final mark and is based on fieldwork undertaken. The report must be between 3000-4000 words long. In the past the fieldtrip for A-level Geography has been to Cornwall for a week. This may or may not change in the future.

Cornwall Field Trip

How will the course help me in the future?

The world needs geographers. Confident, capable and successful geographers possess a variety of transferable skills, such as critical thinking, decision making and the ability to work both independently and collaboratively. It’s well known that studying geography leads to a wealth of study and career opportunities. Geography is highly valued by universities, it is a facilitating subject which combines well with both arts and science subjects. It is a broad based subject with transferable skills that fits well for your future progression; for careers in sustainability, urban regeneration, energy supply, logistics managers, cartography, surveyors, conservation officers, environmental planners and consultancy, geospatial analysts, geographic information systems. Also for careers in business, global economics, law, human rights, international relations or even medicine.

History-Modern

Why choose A-Level History?

Regardless of which History course you choose, all students learn a variety of key skills in History that will help them beyond Sixth Form Level, to University and beyond. An A Level in History will give develop analysis, argument and evaluation and other skills relevant to a number of different vocations. Students who study History can go on to study at University in a wide range of subjects from History itself to related areas such as Politics, Economics, Geography, Sociology or Philosophy. It also has links with vocational qualifications such as BTEC Higher National Certificates/ Diplomas in Media/ Journalism or in Travel and Tourism.

Unit 1:  England, 1509 – 1603 Authority, Nation and Religion (worth 30%)

This unit looks at the changes across England under the Tudor monarchs from Henry VIII to the death of Elizabeth I. Religion, power & the role of Parliament, causes and consequences of rebellion and cultural change are all covered. There is a depth study on the final years of the reign of Elizabeth I and how far the nation was in crisis.

Unit 2:  Luther and the German Reformation 1515 – 1555 (worth 20%)

Unit 2 focuses on the development of the Protestant movement in Germany in the early to mid 16th century. Problems with the Catholic Church, the early role of Martin Luther, the development of a Lutheran movement and reasons for it’s survival are all studied. 50% of the course is assessed through source analysis and the other 50% from recall.

Unit 3:  Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII, 1399 – 1509 (worth 30%)

The final examined unit looks at the split between the royal houses of York and Lancaster. The deposition of Richard II, the reigns of monarchs from both houses, the Wars of the Roses and the successful reuniting under Henry Tudor are all covered.

Unit 4:  Coursework – Tudor Controversy (worth 20%)

This is an academic piece of research into an area of historical debate. Students must identify and investigate an issue, assessing and evaluating the views of three historians and then develop their own view based on their understanding. The piece is 4000 words in length and completed to a university standard with lessons on how to undertake such a piece delivered first.

History-Tudor

Why choose A-Level History?

Regardless of which History course you choose, all students learn a variety of key skills in History that will help them beyond Sixth Form Level, to University and beyond. An A Level in History will give develop analysis, argument and evaluation and other skills relevant to a number of different vocations. Students who study History can go on to study at University in a wide range of subjects from History itself to related areas such as Politics, Economics, Geography, Sociology or Philosophy. It also has links with vocational qualifications such as BTEC Higher National Certificates/ Diplomas in Media/ Journalism or in Travel and Tourism.

Unit 1: Russia, 1917 – 1991: From Lenin to Yeltsin (worth 30%)

The first examined unit looks at the history of Communism in the Soviet Union. The development of communist government, industrial and agricultural change, control of the population and the lives of people are all studied. The unit ends with a focus on the collapse of communism and the Soviet Union.

Unit 2: The German Democratic Republic, 1949 – 1990 (worth 20%)

Unit 2 of the Modern course focuses on the development and life of East Germany after World War Two. The development of the State with key events such as the Berlin Blockade and the construction of the Wall are covered as are social changes and the collapse of nation with reunification in 1990.

Unit 3: The British experience of Warfare, 1790 – 1918 (worth 30%)

The final examined unit in the Modern History course looks at the developments in warfare experienced by Britain from the Napoleonic Wars through to the end of World War One. The changing tactics, technology and attitudes to conflict are covered.

Unit 4: Coursework: Modern History Controversy (worth 20%)

This is an academic piece of research into an area of historical debate. Students must identify and investigate an issue, assessing and evaluating the views of three historians and then develop their own view based on their understanding. The piece is 4000 words in length and completed to a university standard with lessons on how to undertake such a piece delivered first.

Maths

Maths is one of the biggest facilitating subjects and it is essential for many higher education courses and careers. The course encourages students to see the links between different areas of maths and to apply their maths skills across a range of topics. It includes both theoretical mathematics and applied through statistics and mechanics.

In 2019, 76% of students achieved A* to B,
with 31% achieving an A*

Course Structure

This qualification is linear and students will sit their examinations at the end of the two-year course. They will sit three 2 hour papers; pure, pure with mechanics and pure with statistics. Students will need a graphical calculator, the use of which is permitted in all three papers.

Overview of topics

  • Proof and mathematical communication
  • Polynomials
  • Binomial theorem
  • Cartesian coordinate geometry
  • Sequences and series
  • Trigonometric functions
  • Exponentials and logarithms
  • Differentiation
  • Integration
  • Numerical methods
  • Statistical sampling
  • Data presentation and interpretation
  • Probability and discrete random variables
  • Statistical distributions
  • Statistical hypothesis testing
  • Applications of vectors
  • Differential equations
  • Kinematics
  • Forces and Newton’s laws
  • Moments
  •  

Aims of the Course

Students are encouraged to:

  • Develop their understanding of mathematics and mathematical processes in a way that promotes confidence and fosters enjoyment.
  • Develop their abilities to reason logically and recognise incorrect reasoning, to generalise and to construct mathematical proofs.
  • Extend their range of mathematical skills and techniques and use them in more difficult, unstructured problems.
  • Recognise how a situation may be represented mathematically and understand the relationship between ‘real world’ problems and mathematical models.
  • Acquire the skills needed to use technology such as calculators and computers effectively, recognise when such use may be inappropriate and be aware of limitations.

Develop an awareness of the relevance of mathematics to other fields of study, to the world of work and to society in general.

Extra-curricular activities

  • Maths-in-Action at the University of Warwick
  • UKMT Individual Senior Maths Challenge
  • In-house Team Maths Challenge vs. the teachers
  • Problem-solving classes at the University of Warwick

Further Maths

This course is highly regarded by Universities and some will consider reduced grade offers for Further Mathematics, reflecting the difficulty of the option. Some Universities require Further Mathematics to study Mathematics and it is especially useful for students wishing to study Mathematics, Mathematics related courses, Engineering or Sciences.

In 2019, 100% of students achieved A* to C,
with 40% achieving A*

Course Structure

Students taking Maths with Further Mathematics will cover the entire Maths syllabus in year 1 and then the Further Mathematics syllabus in year 2. The Further Mathematics examination will consist of three 2-hour papers; two pure papers and one combined mechanics and statistics paper.

Overview of topics

  • Further proof including by induction
  • Complex numbers
  • Matrices and matrix transformations
  • Roots of polynomials
  • Rational functions
  • Polar coordinates
  • Hyperbolic functions
  • Further calculus
  • Ellipses, parabolas and hyperbolas
  • Maclaurin series and limits
  • Poisson and continuous distributions
  • Confidence intervals
  • Chi-squared tests
  • Work, energy and power
  • Dimensional analysis
  • Momentum and collisions
  • Circular motion
  • Centres of mass

 

This is in addition to studying all of the A2 Mathematics content in year 1

Aims of the Course

Students are encouraged to:

 

  • Further develop their understanding of mathematics and mathematical processes in a way that deepens knowledge and nurtures a fascination for range of topics
  • Further develop their abilities to reason logically and recognise incorrect reasoning, to generalise and to construct rigorous mathematical proofs.
  • Further extend their range of mathematical skills and techniques and use them in more difficult, unstructured problems, incorporating a broad range of areas
  • Recognise how a situation may be represented mathematically and understand the relationship between ‘real world’ problems and mathematical models.
  • Acquire the skills needed to use technology such as calculators and computers effectively, recognise when such use may be inappropriate and be aware of limitations.

Extra-curricular activities

  • GE Energy, Power Conversion trip
  • Senior Team Maths challenge (previous teams were national finalists!)
  • STEP Paper preparation at the University of Warwick
  • Mathematical Olympiad for Girls
  • University entrance interview practice

Modern Foreign Languages

Why study a modern language at A level?

Languages are an invaluable skill to have. The benefits of studying a language are wide-ranging: from learning to communicate in fresh ways to having a window onto the culture of another country, from learning to express your views and listen to the views of others through the language that you are learning to studying its culture through a variety of modern media. By learning to manipulate a language to generate your own ideas and responses, you will broaden your own horizons and appreciate the variety that other languages offer.

Languages can be combined successfully with any other subject at A Level and degree level. It is classed as “a facilitating subject” and enables entry to ‘Russell Group’ universities.  A language A level is highly valued in a number of careers: media, journalism, business, law and finance.

At A Level students study the language and socio-cultural aspects of life in French, German or Spanish speaking countries through a range of topics. The use of the target language is encouraged throughout and we expect students to engage in lively discussion. You will be asked to debate topics and take part in role play situations. Teachers will use up to date news and articles from magazines and newspapers in order to inform you about the different aspects of life in target language countries.

How is the Edexcel A level course organised?

There will be the opportunity to study AS alongside A level as the courses are fully co-teachable.

How is the course examined?

What can I do with this qualification?

You could pursue your Language studies at university as your main subject choice or you could consider a dual honours degree with a Language. e.g. Law with French / Engineering with German / Business Studies with Spanish. With a background in a Western language you have the skills to embark on the study of an Eastern language ab initio eg. Chinese/Japanese/Arabic.

Many universities encourage students to complete Language modules to enhance their employment prospects. Modern Linguists are very employable: the Civil Service, local authorities and other public sector organisations, journalist organisations including the BBC, manufacturing and commercial companies, financial institutions, solicitors' firms and publishing companies.

French

FRENCH is a language of literature, rich in philosophy and culture. It is an important global language spoken widely in North America, Africa and Asia and opens up huge possibilities in the world of business and finance.

 

Year 12

Theme 1: Les changements dans la société française

Theme 1 is set in the context of France only. This theme covers social issues and trends.

 

● Les changements dans les structures familiales

● L’éducation

● Le monde du travail

 

Theme 2: La culture politique et artistique dans les pays francophones

Theme 2 is set in the context of francophone countries and communities. This theme covers

artistic culture (through music and festivals and traditions) and political and artistic culture

(through media).

 

● La musique

● Les médias

● Les festivals et les traditions

 

Study of a work – Intouchables (2011) – Oliver Nakache / Eric Toledano

 

Year 13

Theme 3: L’immigration et la société multiculturelle française

Theme 3 is set in the context of France only. This theme covers social issues and trends.

 

● L’impact positif de l’immigration sur la société française

● Répondre aux défis de l’immigration et l’intégration en France

● L’extrême droite

 

4: L’Occupation et la Résistance

Theme 4 is set in the context of France only. This theme covers political culture.

● La France occupée

● Le régime de Vichy

● La Résistance

Study of a work – Les petits enfants du siècle – Christiane Rochefort (1961)

 

German

GERMAN is an important language for communication in Europe, in particular for business as Germany continues to be Europe’s largest exporter and one of Britain’s biggest traders. The ability to read German publications is also an advantage for scientists: 40% of scientists in the USA recommend their students to learn German.   A recent report in “The Telegraph” (September 2016) cited German as the most useful foreign language to learn, as the highest proportion of UK Companies want to hire employees who know their “umlauts from eszetts”!!

YEAR 12 CONTENT

Theme 1: The developing society in Germany

Theme 1 is set in the context of Germany only. This theme covers social issues and trends.

• Nature and environment (Natur und Umwelt)

• Education (Bildung)

• The world of work (Die Welt der Arbeit)

Theme 2: Political and artistic culture in the German speaking countries

Theme 2 is set in the context of German-speaking countries and communities. This theme

covers artistic culture (through music and festivals and traditions) and political and artistic

culture (through media).

• Music (Musik)

• The media (Die Medien)

• The role offestivals and traditions (Die Rolle von Festen und Traditionen)

Study of a work: Film “ Das Leben der Anderen”

YEAR 13 CONTENT

Theme 3: Immigration und  the German multicultural society

Theme 3 is set in the context of Germany only. This theme covers social issues and trends.

• The positive effect of immigration (Die positive Auswirkung von Immigration)

• The challenges of immigration and integration (Die Herausforderungen von Immigration und Integration)

• The reaction of state and society to immigration (Die staatliche und soziale Reaktion zur Immigration)

Theme 4: Die Wiedervereinigung Deutschlands

Theme 4 is set in the context of Germany only. This theme covers political culture.

• East German society before the re-unification (Die Gesellschaft in der DDR vor der   Wiedervereinigung)

• Events before the re-unification (Ereignisse vor der Wiedervereinigung)

• Germany since the re-unification (Deutschland seit der Wiedervereinigung)

Study of a work: Play “ Der Besuch der alten Dame” by F. Dürrenmatt

 

Spanish

SPANISH is widely spoken throughout the world and thus offers many opportunities in the business and finance world. Recent social and cultural revolutions and evolution within Spain mean that it is a constantly changing and challenging country to study. Spanish is spoken widely in South America and the Spanish speaking countries are exciting and culturally diverse.

 

YEAR 12 CONTENT

Theme 1: La evolución de la sociedad española

 

Theme 1 is set in the context of Spain only.

El cambio en la estructura familiar

El mundo laboral

El impacto turístico en España

 

Theme 2: La cultura política y artística en el mundo de habla española

 

Theme 2 is set in the context of Spanish-speaking countries and communities.

La música

Los medios de comunicación

Los festivales y las tradiciones

 

Study of a work: FILM: Laberinto del Fauno by Guillermo del Toro

 

YEAR 13 CONTENT

Theme 3: La inmigración y la sociedad multicultural española

 

Theme 3 is set in the context of Spain only.

La inmigración históricamente y contemporáneamente

La integración y el multiculturalismo

 

Theme 4: La dictadura franquista y la transición a la democracia

 

Theme 4 is set in the context of Spain only.

La dictadura franquista

• El paso de la dictadura a la democracia

 

Study of a work: PLAY: La casa de Bernarda Alba

Music

The aims of the course are:

  • To promote an enjoyment of and an interest in music as a performer, as a composer and as an audience member.
  • To extend the skills, knowledge and understanding needed to communicate through music.

 

  • To encourage the appreciation of social, historical and cultural influences in music.
  • To develop imagination, creativity, individual and ensemble skills.

 

Music A Level

 

Exam Board - Eduqas

In A Level Music, there are 2 options for students regarding Component 1 - Performing and Component 2 - Composing. Students must choose either Option A in Components 1 and 2 OR Option B in Components 1 and 2

 

Component 1 – Performing

 

Option A: A balanced performance of between 10-12 minutes in duration. 35%
Option B: A balanced performance of between 6-8 minutes in duration. 25%

We will be visited in the March – April of the year of examination by an Eduqas external examiner.
 

Component 2 – Composing

 

Option A: Two compositions of 4-6 minutes in duration. One of the compositions will be in response to an exam board set brief. 25%
Option B: Three compositions of 8-10 minutes in duration. One composition must be in the Western Classical Tradition, one in response to an exam board set brief and the final composition will be in a student chosen genre. 35%

This element is externally assessed by Eduqas.

 

Component 3 – Listening and Appraising 40%

The 2 hour 15 minute listening exam tests student on their musical knowledge of the Areas of Study. There are 3 Areas of Study.

 

Area of Study -  Western Classical Music (1750-1900). This Area of Study has a detailed, associated set work. This is Haydn Symphony 104 in D Major, ‘London’. We also study the development of the symphony from its emergence in the early classical period to the close of the romantic period. Students will gain an understanding of how the symphonic genre developed using a number of examples from different composers and different periods.

Area of Study -  Musical Theatre is where we study the repertoire of several major musical theatre composers (Lloyd-Webber, Schwartz, Sondheim, Bernstein, Rogers and Schonberg). Whilst there are no set works for this area of study, students will develop their knowledge of musical theatre features, how musical theatre has developed over time as well as the relationships between songs and music.
 

Area of StudyInto the Twentieth Century is where learners will study the works of representative European composers from the period as a basis for understanding how music is created, developed and performed for different audiences in the late nineteenth an early twentieth centuries. The development of music in this period is categorised into successive but overlapping ‘schools’ of composition – Impressionism; Expressionism; and Neo-classicism.

There are two setworks associated with this Area of Study and these are

Trio for Oboe, Bassoon and Piano, Movement II: Poulenc
Three Nocturnes, Number 1, Nuages: Debussy.

 

  • There are 4 questions in the listening exam.
  • Question A is a set work analysis question
  • Question B is an extended (written) response
  • Question C is general listening (unprepared extracts)
  • Question D is a comparison exercise

 

 

Music Technology

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sound Engineering. This qualification is equivalent to one A level, and carries the same weighting, UCAS points, and value.

 

Sound engineering is part of the creative and music industries. These are global industries that outgrew the rest of the economy, generating £84.1 billion of value for the country during 2014. Approximately 1.8 million people are employed in creative industries occupations in the UK, of which sound engineering plays an important part. Sound engineering skills are required in diverse areas of the industry, from chart-topping audio recordings to live performances and television shows.

 

What does the qualification cover?

The BTEC National is divided into mandatory units, and optional units. These are either internally or externally assessed.

 

There are two mandatory units, which cover the following aspects of sound engineering:

  • studio recording techniques (internally assessed)
  • digital audio workstation (DAW) production (externally assessed)

 

You will be able to add three optional units, from a choice of four, to the mandatory content. All optional units are internally assessed.

 

The optional units cover areas such as:

  • live sound
  • mixing and mastering techniques
  • studio design and acoustics
  • working and developing as a production team.

 

While taking this qualification, you will be required to engage with sector employers as part of your course, where you will be given opportunities to develop practical skills in preparation for employment.

 

What could this qualification lead to?

This BTEC is a valuable qualification for those looking to work in any sector involving performing arts, music, drama, theatre, mathematics, or physics, and the skills and knowledge gained on this course can be used in a wide range of careers.
 

This qualification will also prepare you for direct employment in the sound engineering sector, and is suitable if you wish to work in entry level roles such as:

· live music assistant

· assistant sound engineer

· audio-visual technician/broadcast assistant.

 

Will the qualification lead to further learning?

There are many roles in this sector where recruitment is at graduate level. The qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers as contributing to meeting admission requirements to many relevant courses.

 

The qualification is a good complimentary option alongside other subjects such as, Music, Theatre Studies, Drama, Physics, Mathematics, and Media Studies, and would be suitable for entry into any of these degrees, or related subject areas such as:

 

  • BA (Hons) Music
  • BA (Hons) Drama
  • BSc (Hons) Mathematics
  • BSc (Hons) Physics
  • BEng (Hons) Acoustical Engineering

 

This course offers a counter-balance for some of the heavier academic subjects, whilst still providing a valuable and rigorous qualification. For example, if taken alongside A levels in Mathematics and Physics, it could lead to a more specialised degree such as:

 

● BSc (Hons) in Sound Engineering and Production

● BSc (Hons) in Live Sound Technology

● BEng (Hons) in Audio Acoustics.

 

You may also progress to a higher or degree apprenticeship. You should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific higher education providers.

PE

Is this course for me?

Do you have a high level of enthusiasm for sport in all its forms? Have you got a sound understanding of the theory aspects from GCSE PE/BTEC Sport? If so, this could be the course for you. This is a demanding course and a lot more time will be spent on theory aspects than the practical ones.

 

What else do I need to know?

Unlike GCSE/BTEC Sport, this course is mainly theory based. However you will be assessed in one practical sport (70% theory; 30% practical) for which you do have the option of performing or coaching.

 

Where could it lead?

The PE subject could lead you towards numerous University courses, including: Sports Studies, Sports Science, PE teacher training, Leisure Studies, Sports Management, Strength and Conditioning, Exercise and Health, Nutrition, Sports Rehabilitation and Physiotherapy. In addition, A level PE is now well regarded as an A level subject when applying to courses in different fields of study. It will also help to gain employment in most sporting sectors such as: Sports Coaching, PE teacher training, Physiotherapy, Personal training, Sports Psychologist, lecturer, Sports Management and Sporting Events.

 

How is the course organised?

The course in intended for students who are both physically able and who have a strong desire to study in Physical Education.

Physics

If you have an inquisitive mind and would like to discover and understand more about the physical world around you then Physics could be the subject for you.

Physics deals with profound questions about the nature of the Universe and with some of the most important, practical, environmental and technological issues of our time. Physics is concerned with observing natural phenomena and man-made systems, trying to understand them and predict what might happen in new and unknown situations.

It is a very broad subject and therefore develops skills that are useful outside Physics, e.g. practical and mathematical problem solving, the ability to reason clearly and communicate complex ideas. As well as classical Physics, more modern ideas such as cosmology, medical and nuclear Physics are also studied. The wide range of skills acquired by studying A level Physics mean many career paths are possible including engineering, IT, medicine, finance and of course, rocket scientist!

Product Design

Introduction A Level Product Design

This creative and thought-provoking qualification gives students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in a number of careers. Especially those in the creative industries.

They will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing products of their choice. It is important to note that practical work is only one element of this DESIGN course. 

Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and employers.

This qualification is linear. Linear means that students will sit all their exams and submit all their non-exam assessment (NEA) at the end of the course.

What's assessed  Paper 1

Core technical principles and core designing and making principles.

How it's assessed

• Written exam: 2 hours

• 100 marks

• 25% of A-level

Questions

Mixture of short answer, multiple choice and extended response.

Paper 2

What's assessed  Paper 2

Specialist knowledge, technical and designing and making principles.

How it's assessed

• Written exam: 2 hours

• 25% of A-level

Questions

Mixture of short answer, multiple choice and extended response questions.

Section A:

• Product Analysis.

• Up to 6 short answer questions based on visual stimulus of product(s).

Section B:

• Commercial manufacture.

• Mixture of short and extended response questions

What's assessed  Non-exam assessment (NEA)

Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles and specialist knowledge

How it's assessed

• Substantial design and make task

Evidence

 

Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.

assessment (NEA)

 

In order to keep in touch with the commercial world and to develop your understanding of design you will take part in numerous manufacturing and exhibition visits, such as: V & A Museum (London), Design Museum (London), BMW Mini (Oxford) and NP Aerospace (Coventry).

Psychology

Psychology at Kenilworth School

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE DEPARTMENT

Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. You will develop an understanding of the world around you by looking at a variety of perspectives on behaviour, for example, the development of gender, the process of memory and forgetting and the origins of aggression. In addition to subject-based skills and knowledge, students of psychology also acquire a number of transferable skills e.g. IT literacy, data handling and analysis, independent and team research, report writing and learning to work ethically and professionally with people – all highly valued in a range of fields.

The emphasis of the course is on applying knowledge, understanding and developing the skills of analysis, evaluation and critical thinking.

 

 

WHY STUDY PSYCHOLOGY?

Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. You will develop an understanding of the world around you by looking at a variety of perspectives on behaviour, for example, the development of gender, the process of memory and forgetting, and the origins of aggression. In addition to subject-based skills and knowledge, students of psychology also acquire a number of transferable skills e.g. IT literacy, data handling and analysis, independent and team research, report writing and learning to work ethically and professionally with people – all highly valued in a range of fields. The emphasis of the course is on applying knowledge, understanding and developing the skills of analysis, evaluation and critical thinking.

 

Students will study the majority of units 1 and 2 in their first year in the Sixth Form and these units are designed establish foundation knowledge in Psychology. In their second year students will study some additional areas related to units 1 and 2 as well as examining some more specialised areas.

 

FUTURE ACADEMIC AND CAREER PATHWAYS

Those who train in psychology can go on to work in a variety of professions such as forensic, clinical or sport and exercise psychology or work as professional psychologists in the National Health Service, the Civil Service, education and industry. Psychology also provides a very useful basis for a wide range of other careers such as human resources, business, education and youth work.

 

COURSE CONTENT

Students will be studying the AQA syllabus.

Three units taken over two years explore topics including:

obedience and conformity; memory; the development of attachments; mental health; brain structure and function; research methods as well as atypical and antisocial behaviours such as schizophrenia and aggression. Students will also be carrying out practical research allowing for the development of research method skills and experiencing ‘psychology in action’.

 

ASSESSMENT

Unit 1: Social influence, memory, attachment, psychopathology

Unit 2: Approaches in psychology, biopsychology, research methods

Unit 3: Issues and debates, typical, atypical and antisocial behaviour

 

This will be assessed through three, 2 hour exams – one for each unit taken at the end of Year 13. Each paper is worth one third of the overall course grade. There are a range of multiple choice, short and longer answer essay style questions.

Religious Studies

Why study Religious Studies?

Religious Studies offer you an interesting and intellectually challenging A Level. It helps develop understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues. Religious Studies develops a variety of skills, including those of discussion and debate. The valuable skills of logical argument and critical evaluation are also developed and can be transferred to other areas of study. Religious Studies is a useful stepping stone to many careers where it helps to understand what people believe and how it affects their lives. For example medicine, social work, law, the armed services, police force, journalism, teaching and many more.

What will you Study?

The course is broken down into 3 exams:

Philosophy of religion:

  • ancient philosophical influences
  • arguments about the existence or non-existence of God
  • the nature and impact of religious experience
  • the challenge to religious belief from the problem of evil
  • the nature of the soul, mind and body
  • ideas about the nature of God*
  • issues in religious language*

 

Religion and ethics:

  • religious ethical theories: Natural Law & Situation Ethics
  • secular ethical theories: Utilitarianism & The Categorical Imperative
  • the application of ethical theory to two contemporary issues of importance (euthanasia and business ethics)
  • ethical language and thought*
  • debates around the conscience*
  • sexual ethics and its influence on ethical thought/ developments in religious belief*

 

Developments in religious thought:

  • The person of Jesus Christ
  • Sources of authority for Christians
  • Augustine’s teachings on human nature
  • Bonhoeffer and moral action
  • Christian teachings on death and the afterlife
  • Knowledge of God’s existence
  • Religion and society*
  • Practices which shape religious thought and tradition*
  • Significant historical and social developments in theology and religious thought*

Sociology

What is Sociology?  At its simplest Sociology can be defined as the study of human society and social behaviour. The majority of us live in family groups, experience school from an early age, use the media and have knowledge of parts of a wider community so we are familiar with some of the subject areas that are the concern of the sociologist. August 2011 saw major riots in English cities. The sociologist is challenged to explain such events and provide answers to questions like,  who was involved, how did society react, did the media fuel the riots and how can similar behaviour be prevented? In order to appreciate the nature of society and to understand human behaviour, we need to acquire sociological knowledge and develop the specialist skills of sociological enquiry.

Course Content

  • Family and Households
  • Research Methods
  • Crime and Deviance
  • Sociological Theory
  • The Media

The A Level consists of three exams which each last for 2 hours:

  • Paper 1           Sociology of Education, Sociological Theory and Research                         Methods
  • Paper 2           Family and Households, The Media
  • Paper 3           Crime and Deviance, Theory and Methods

Each exam is worth one third of the A Level marks

Family and Households

This topic examines the changing role of the family and includes topics such as the impact of feminism, and whether children are allowed to act as themselves in today’s society.

Education

This topic examines possible explanations of achievement in schools in relation to social class, gender and ethnicity.  We also consider how our ability and teachers’ expectations impact on achievement.

Social Research Methods

In addition students will consider a range of social research methods.  For example when studying the summer riots researchers might choose to interview participants, to study crime statistics or even to do undercover research.

The Media

This topic examines the significance of new media on our society, the relationship between the media, content and audiences.  It also considers how the media represents different groups in society.

Crime and Deviance

Much of the time is spent on the fascinating study of crime, looking at contrasting explanations of why different types of crime occur, among juveniles, the wealthy, women and so on.  Students are encouraged to link their sociological knowledge to topical events.  For example they will assess the ways in which media influences may have led to further rioting in 2011.  We look at topical issues such as whether the recent Volkswagen scandal is an example of corporate crime.

Sociological Theory

Includes approaches such as feminism and Marxism.

Students will not be required to complete coursework.

Why Study Sociology?

  • It is a constant intellectual challenge and demands a mature, critical approach.
  • It helps students to develop analytical skills.
  • It enables students to develop the key skill of communication.
  • Sociology is relevant to most other subject areas.
  • Sociology has relevance for many careers, eg. media and journalism, law, medical and social welfare, advertising, teaching, human resources, management, a career in the police force etc.
  • Sociology brings about a personal but objective awareness of the world of others and of self.
  • The Sociology Department is well established and very successful.

 

Statistics

Statistics is an application of mathematics and a field of study in its own right. Our lives are influenced increasingly by statistics and knowing just how it fits into other areas of life is a definite advantage. Statistics is used in many careers, for example deciding how much of a product a supermarket needs to buy, whether or not a new drug has a positive effect on a serious illness or understanding statements and figures quoted by politicians. Most careers now require some understanding of statistics.

Statistics combines well with a broad range of subjects, including Biology, Geography, Psychology, Sociology, Economics and Business Studies. This subject will appeal to those who want to study a numerate subject but do not want to study lots of algebra and pure mathematics.

Course Structure

This qualification is linear and students will sit their examinations at the end of the two-year course. They will sit three 2 hour papers. Students will need a graphical calculator, the use of which is permitted in all three papers.

Overview of topics

Numerical measures and statistical diagrams

Probability

Sampling and estimates

Probability distributions

Binomial distribution

Normal distribution

Regression analysis

Hypothesis testing

Contingency tables

One and two sample non-parametric tests

Bayes’ theorem

Experimental design

Hypothesis testing

Paired tests

Exponential and Poisson distribution

Goodness of fit

Analysis of variance

Effect size

Statistical Enquiry Cycle (SEC)